This is by no means a comprehensive collection of diverse images. But, it’s a start and hopefully a good resource for people to remember when using photos in professional or personal posts. Representation matters. Help be a part of the change to make that happen.

One of the pieces of feedback I hear from people is that they don’t know where to find diverse images to use. Well, no more excuses. This blog post is a resource with lots of links to get you started.

Disclaimer 1: always check the resources for permissible usage for your needs.


(Originally published by the author on October 25, 2015.)

Today, I rode a bike.

It was a bubble gum pink beach cruiser with fat tires and a wide seat.

I rode on the bike path that hugs the coastline from downtown Monterey, California out past the Great Tide Pool in Point Pinos. It’s about a 10-mile round trip journey.

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Why is this worthy of a blog post? Bike riding terrifies me.

You know those crippling anxious feelings some people have about public speaking, heights or riding a roller coaster? That’s how I feel about bike riding.

The expression, “it’s like riding a bike,” means that once a skill is learned it is never forgotten. In my case, it’s not just the muscle memory of bike riding that I never forgot, but the anxiety that always accompanied it. …


I feel very privileged to have attended summer camp as a child. I know that wasn’t a luxury that everyone had. Even more so, in hindsight, I feel privileged the summer camp I attended was racially diverse. Back when I was a kid, I didn’t think of camp as being “racially diverse.” It was camp. I had Black friends, I had Asian friends, I had white friends. We were all campers.

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One summer, my cabin happened to only have one Black camper in it. Her name was Bernadette*. (Name changed for privacy purposes.) Everyone in the cabin got along. We didn’t have any issues. …


Have you ever had that friend or relative who wants to have dinner with you, and then selects a restaurant that is conveniently a 5-minute drive from their house — but an hour and 15 minute drive from yours? Or, are you just a map nerd like me and are curious about the halfway point between two different places? Then, get to know MeetWays.com!

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Now, there may very well be other apps or websites out there that does this same thing. I don’t care about them. I’ve been using MeetWays for a long time and it’s my go-to.

The very first thing you need to understand about this geographic tool is that the midway point it will give you will correlate to a restaurant, coffee shop, etc. The idea is that it’s finding a midway point for you to meet up with someone. So, if you are looking for a mapping tool that gives you the exact midpoint location — even if in the middle of a desert, then perhaps this tool isn’t the best choice for that purpose. But, if you need a place for lunch that’s an even and fair distance between two points — then you’ll love MeetWays. …


After working in law firms for ten years as a librarian, I am very much familiar with the resource CNS, aka, Courthouse News Service. What I didn’t realize is that it is largely unfamiliar to people outside of the legal industry. So, consider this your introduction and primer on this legal news resource that has a lot of free components, with some subscription advanced features.

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Overall, consider CNS as a legal news service for civil litigation (as opposed to criminal law) in the U.S. Essentially, their free offerings include articles written by CNS staff about a variety of court cases. Their paid subscriptions likely go beyond what a casual OSINT researcher would need, but know that they can contain more in-depth information about court cases like court documents and other insight. What a lot of lawyers value the most about the CNS subscription is the access to what are called Dingers. Dingers are up-to-the-minute updates about filings and motions made in court cases. It’s such a big deal that there’s even a free App for it — The NEW CNS Mobile Dinger App : Motion Granted! …


When you work in IT or Security, or even just have a modicum of technical knowledge, family gatherings can turn into work time. Your chair at the table suddenly becomes the Help Desk. You’re just trying to enjoy a meal but wind up answering questions about password strength between forkfuls of food.

Here are some tips to help alleviate the stress of being forced to be “on” when you really just want to be in a food coma.

(1) Be polite! Remember, tech and security are often scary subjects to people not in our industry. We don’t want to scare people away from good practices. You may be the only Information Security professional your family comes in contact with. As I talked about in my DerbyCon 2019 talk, “Empathy as a Service to Create a Culture of Security ,” you need to try to be approachable and listen to what people are really asking. So, where does politeness come into play? If pressed upon to explain SIM jacking to Uncle Irv during the first course of dinner, ask to delay the conversation until after dessert. “That’s a great question and surely a big problem, Uncle Irv, but I’d really like to enjoy this meal and not think about work. How about we gather around after dessert, and I can explain some of the points to you?” You know your family dynamics, but it stands to reason that most polite requests for a deferment in the conversation should be respected. Your mileage may vary. It’s inevitable that you’ll have to do some “shop talk.” …


Qwant.com touts itself as, “the European search engine that respects your privacy.” Is this a European version of Duck Duck Go? Let’s check it out!

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Kicking the tires

First, I wanted to see what kind of search results I would receive. I started off with a basic news search for the term cybersecurity. (search string) Much to my surprise and satisfaction, two out of the four top results returned were news items of interest to me that I had not previously seen elsewhere.

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Within a search, you can narrow your focus to:

  • Web
  • News
  • Images
  • Social
  • Maps
  • Shopping
  • Videos
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Now, where Qwant really shines is that you can change your search results not only based on country but by language. They appear to offer search engine results from 34 countries, in 26 interface languages. Although, finding the actual list that isn’t in the drop-down menu was a challenge. …


When I worked for a law firm that specialized in insurance, the Insurance Information Institute was a useful resource to me. Now that Information Security OSINT research has really grown and expanded, I wanted to highlight their site as a place where you can find some interesting facts!

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The I.I.I. is a 60-year independent source for data and research related to the insurance industry. Read more about their organization and purpose here. According to their “About us” page, their “mission is to improve public understanding of insurance — what it does and how it works.” So, you are guaranteed to get useful information that isn’t filled with industry jargon. …


The Mechanics’ Institute is one of my favorite resources. Despite how the name sounds, it is a private library (as opposed to public) that offers excellent access to online collections for a membership fee.

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From their website: Founded in 1854, the Mechanics’ Institute is one of the oldest institutions on the West Coast of the United States. Its mission is to provide a center for intellectual and cultural advancement. Located in the financial district of San Francisco, it serves individuals and families throughout the Bay Area offering a vibrant library with full-time professional staff, expert instruction and competition in chess, and a full calendar of engaging cultural events, programs, and classes. Anyone can join the Institute for a small annual fee. …


In the vein of the Internet Archive and the Wayback Machine, oldweb.today gives you the opportunity to view previous versions of websites.

This is a very simple website, brought to you by Rhizome.

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As you can see from the screen capture above, you can choose which browser view you’d like, the ability to direct it to a specific URL, and the choice of a past date. Much like Google’s “I’m Feeling Lucky,” you can just let the program give you a random site.

When I selected the “I’m Feeling Random!” option, this is what I got.

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If you can’t see the URL in that screen capture, it was for porno[.]com. How quaint. But, as you can also see, it’s an inactive website. So, nothing to see here — -thankfully. …

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InfoSecSherpa

#Librarian turned #InformationSecurity professional. Your guide up a mountain of information!

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